AlopeciaDX Blood Test

Many of our clients experiencing hair thinning and hair loss are left with a lot of unanswered questions. Here at HPIHair, we want to help our clients get to the root cause of their hair loss. Our AlopeciaDX blood test is composed of a variety of different factors that may cause hair thinning or loss.

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    Alopecia – why me?

    Hair loss occurs for a great many reasons, from conditions that make people literally pull it out to complete hair loss caused by the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. Some causes are considered natural, while others signal serious healthproblems. Some conditions are confined to the scalp. Others reflect disease throughout the body. Being plainly visible,the skin and its components can provide early signs of disease elsewhere in the body. The first clue to the specific cause is the pattern of hair loss, whether it be complete baldness (alopecia totalis), patchy bald spots, thinning, or hair loss confinedto certain areas. Also a factor is the condition of the hair and the scalp beneath it.

    • HPIHair: Alopecia
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    What’s in the Blood Test Panel?

    In our panel, we are specially looking for underlying medical issues, along with vitamin and mineral deficiencies. More specifically we are looking for:

    Iron Deficiencies – Iron is essential for the production of hemoglobin. Low hemoglobin results in a reduction of oxygen, which healthy hair requires. When iron levels are low oxygen cannot be transferred for healthy hair.
    Thyroid Dysfunction – Disruption of the thyroid causes the hair growth cycle to remain in the resting phase, causing hair loss.
    Vitamin Deficiencies – Vitamins stimulate new growth in hair follicles. Without optimal levels, growth can be stunted.
    Mineral Deficiencies – Lack of certain minerals inhibits the hairs ability to grow at a cellular level and affects the hair growth cycles. Certain minerals also help to strengthen the hair follicle.
    Gene Mutation – Certain gene mutations may play a vital roll in the hair cycle of both growth and strength.
    Amino Acid – Amino acids are essential for healthy hair. These are especially important for the growth cycle and strength of hair.

    Alopecia Areata

    Alopecia areata is considered an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system, which is designed to protect the body from foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, mistakenly attacks the hair follicles, the structures from which hairs grow. This can lead to hair loss on the scalp and elsewhere.
    In most cases, hair falls out in small, round patches about the size of a quarter. In many cases, the disease does not extend beyond a few bare patches. In some people, hair loss is more extensive. Although uncommon, the disease can progress to cause total loss of hair on the scalp (referred to as alopecia areata totalis) or complete loss of hair on the scalp, face, and body (alopecia areata universalis).

    AlopeciaDX Study Results

    Introduction: Several underlying medical conditions have been linked to alopecia. In addition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies are thought to play a role in hair shedding. Our clinical observations suggest that certain vitamins and minerals, as well as gene mutations, play a role in hair loss.

    Methods: Clients were enrolled in a one-time cohort study. Blood plasma samples were drawn and analyzed to determine underlying medical conditions, vitamin levels, mineral levels, and gene mutations. Each client underwent a past medical history review. Clients’ alopecia was graded on the Hamilton-Norwood Scale. Comparisons were reviewed and analyzed.

    Alopecia Totalis

    Alopecia Totalis is an autoimmune disorder which effectively turns your own immune system against your hair follicles. It results in total hair loss on the scalp, and can affect eyebrows and eyelashes. However, Alopecia Totalis can affect nails as well as hair, causing them to become thin, brittle and ridged. Beyond hair loss, Alopecia Totalis has no physical side effects. It does not induce pain or sickness and the quality of life for sufferers is generally not affected, except by the psychological implications that accompany any form of hair loss. The condition is not contagious, but is thought to have a genetic influence, so there is an increased chance that sons and daughters could face the same issues – learn more information.

    Study Results and Conclusions

    Results: Twelve clients were enrolled (4 males, 8 females) in the HPIHair AlopeciaDX study. All male clients were experiencing hair loss. Two female clients did not have hair loss, four females were experiencing thinning hair and/or loss, and two females were significantly impacted with hair loss.

    Complete blood counts were within normal limits on all participants. Seventy-five percent (75%) of male clients had a vitamin deficiency. While all the male clients were within the normal range for minerals, they were not within optimal ranges. Twenty-five percent (25%) of female clients were found to have an underlying medical issue which was likely causing hair loss or at a minimum, a contributing factor–such as postpartum or hereditary concerns. Seventy-five percent (75%) of female clients also experienced low vitamin levels. All females were below optimal levels of minerals tested. Of the four females tested for gene mutation, three of them were positive (75%).  

    Conclusion: There is a significant increase in hair loss and low vitamin levels, showing some evidence of causation. There is also a clear link between low (below optimal) levels of minerals and hair loss. Gene mutations may also play a role in hair shedding.  

    Alopecia Universalis

    Alopecia universalis (AU) is a condition characterized by the complete loss of hair on the scalp and body. It is an advanced form of alopecia areata, a condition that causes round patches of hair loss. Although the exact cause of AU is unknown, it is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which an affected person’s immune system mistakenly attacks the hair follicles. Roughly 20% of affected people have a family member with alopecia, suggesting that genetic factors may contribute to the development of AU.
    Most people with AU do not have other signs and symptoms, but some may experience a burning sensation or itching on affected areas. In some cases, AU can be associated with other conditions such as atopic dermatitis, thyroid disorders, and/or nail changes. Additional information.

    How HPIHair Can Help

    Every medical condition affects each person in different ways. Hair loss is no different and may be the only symptom or one of many. If hair loss is the sole complaint, you may be led to believe it’s simply your genetics. Genetics may indeed play a role, but genetics are not the singular factor contributing or causing hair loss. Often times there are multiple variables playing a role in hair loss, and understanding the cause can be the difference between losing more hair or stopping it. With the AlopeciaDX testing, we have the technology, skill, and knowledge to help accurately diagnose factors leading to your hair thinning, shedding, and loss.

    Stop Hiding and Start Living, Again!
    Call Today & Restore Your Confidence!

    Alopecia and balding is not something you have to live with just because it maybe in your blood. Contact HPIHair Partners to schedule a consultation and find out about the numerous treatment options that are available. Call us to get started (615-662-8722) or use the online request form.